Don’t worry, be happy

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Scott Low was thinking about the happiness of his fellow man when he started Hatch Camp and Art Farm. Hatch Camp and Art Farm, a campground built around fly fishing, music and art, hugs a half-mile of Warwoman Creek on Joe Speed Road in Clayton. It provides a guided trout stream and is one of only...

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Scott Low was thinking about the happiness of his fellow man when he started Hatch Camp and Art Farm.

Hatch Camp and Art Farm, a campground built around fly fishing, music and art, hugs a half-mile of Warwoman Creek on Joe Speed Road in Clayton. It provides a guided trout stream and is one of only two fly shops in Rabun County.

“It’s all about making people find some happiness in their lives, whether it be through fishing, music, art, to stay in the mountains camping,” said Low, who has owned Hatch Camp since July 2017. “I wanted to create a place where people can come and have fun and be happy.”

Hatch Camp welcomes everyone from veteran fly fishermen to those wanting to learn. Low said the staff has experience working with a variety of skill levels and can have someone who has never touched a fly rod catching trout in just a few hours.

Musicians often play at Hatch Camp’s small stage. The venue hosts a few concerts per month.

Although Hatch Camp is primarily used for fly fishing, it is open as a camping spot to allow folks to hike the surrounding trails, visit area shops and see other nearby destinations. Hatch Camp can also be reserved for parties and other occasions.

Low said his ultimate goal for Hatch Camp is to make it into an all-inclusive fly-fishing resort on a smaller scale. The venue has portable toilets, but once construction on the permanent restrooms are finished, Low said he plans to open the camp for larger events.

Low said he wants to have events that serve military veterans.

Hatch Camp made plans to team with Team Georgia, a competitive fly-fishing team from Northeast Georgia, to host a charity fly-fishing tournament benefiting military service members in May.

The event was for Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing Inc., an organization with a mission to help the physical and emotional rehabilitation of disabled active military service personnel and disabled veterans through fly fishing and other outdoor activities.

Low said Hatch Camp is secluded just enough to provide visitors with what they are looking for.

“We have neighbors and traffic,” he said. “It’s not like you’re going to Alaska or your helicoptering into somewhere. But to be able to host a group like Casting For Recovery or Project Healing Waters would be great.”