City honors life-saving responders

  • The Cleveland City Council recognized police officer Raymond Rutledge and firefighters Martin Godfrey and Lt. Mark Gunter at their meeting on Monday, Oct. 14. Pictured, front from left, are Rutledge and council member Bradley Greene; back from left, Godfrey, Gunter, council members Annie Sutton, Nan Bowen and Kevin Stanley. (Photo/Stephanie Hill)
    The Cleveland City Council recognized police officer Raymond Rutledge and firefighters Martin Godfrey and Lt. Mark Gunter at their meeting on Monday, Oct. 14. Pictured, front from left, are Rutledge and council member Bradley Greene; back from left, Godfrey, Gunter, council members Annie Sutton, Nan Bowen and Kevin Stanley. (Photo/Stephanie Hill)
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Two firefighters and a police officer were lauded for saving the life of citizen who was overdosing.

Cleveland firefighters Martin Godfrey and Lt. Mark Gunter, and Cleveland Police Officer Raymond Rutledge were honored at the Cleveland City Council’s Monday, Oct. 7, meeting for recognizing the signs of an overdose and knowing what to do by administering Narcan to the victims. Narcan is a medication that helps reverse an opioid overdose.

A city proclamation commended the three for their “selfless and courageous efforts, good citizenship, and service to others.”

The council wanted to recognize the men as a way to “express their gratitude and appreciation for (their) bravery, courage and dedication to the City of Cleveland.”

“I would like to state we are super proud of these guys,” said Councilwoman Annie Sutton. “[Police] Chief [John] Foster showed the video and it was amazing how calm they stayed.”

Gunter said the responders were just doing their jobs and felt humbled by the accolade.

“We appreciate the recognition that comes with it, and we would never turn the opportunity down to help anybody in the city or the county,” Gunter said. “The education that goes along with it, as we’ve seen, that it has went a long ways, and I’m thankful that the city has allowed us to get the knowledge and training to do it and supplying this for the public.”

For Rutledge, he was the first one on the scene of the incident and said he knew what to do thanks to his training.

“It’s a good feeling like I said to be recognized in the community for what you’re doing in your job,” Rutledge said.

Foster said training and equipping responders with Narcan is one way they are trying to combat the opioid epidemic.

“This is just another tool for public safety to be able to use to assist these people to get back into the reality of life and living the way they’re suppose to live,” Foster said. “It’s a second chance for a lot of people.”